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The Fight to Protect Musicians’ Rights Continues Beyond Brexit Day

The UK is out of the European Union as of Friday 31 January. But the fight to protect musicians working in the EU is far from over. More than ever, the campaign for the Musicians’ Passport needs your support.
 

Photograph of sign held up at protest reading
We are proud to have fought for our membership of the EU. Staying in the EU was always the best option for musicians. Photo credit: Shutterstock

We are proud to have fought for our membership of the EU. Staying in the EU was always the best option for musicians. Now, we’re heading into uncharted territory. Your rights as a musician will not change until December 2020. But nobody knows what is coming after that date.

Government must protect music

Not only is our industry worth £5.2bn to the UK economy, it also employs over 190,000 people. That includes over 31,000 musicians who make up the MU.

Government must protect the music industry. That means protecting the musicians whose skills and talents the industry relies on.

There are three big issues affecting us – visas, carnets, and the future of tax arrangements including VAT.

As music venues close and streaming means there is less money in recorded music, touring is plugging the gap. Traveling to perform has become more and more important to making a living. And the impact of any extra costs to touring could mean an end to all but the biggest names in UK music going out on tour.

That all means jobs lost, and less diversity in the stories we tell and are told.

Plus with any future arrangements being reciprocal, that means your favourite European artists might struggle to get here too.

Venues, festivals, theatres, and all those who rely on live performance are worried about what Brexit negotiations will mean for their futures as well.

It can get better

There are three things you can do right now to protect musicians’ right to keep working in the EU post-Brexit:

  • Add your voice to the call for the Musicians’ Passport. Sign the petition now.
  • Invite your MP to the MU’s event in Parliament on Tuesday 4 February. Find out how.
  • Tell us where you’re working in the EU today! Tag us in on Twitter and Instagram at @WeAreTheMU, or on Facebook @Musicians.Union and use the hashtag #ThankEUforthemusic.

Published: 31/01/2020

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